Daniel Rozin & Self-Centered Mirror!

Daniel Rozin & Self-Centered Mirror!

Self-Centered Mirror is an arrangement of 34 vertical panes of mirror. It has a retro-reflective behavior, and anyone standing in front of this mirror will see themselves reflected on all 34 panes. The mirror is designed to isolate a very narrow field of vision, and seemingly reflects the image of each viewer individually. It physically illustrates the narcissistic gaze that is usually associated with mirrored reflection. This piece is a wall-mounted sculpture that curves out from the wall on its left and right sides.

Artist and computer developer Daniel Rozin is best-known for incorporating ingenious engineering and his own algorithms to make installations that change and respond to the presence and point of view of the viewer. Exploring the subjectivity of self-perception, Rozin’s works are made from a wide array of materials from video to wooden pegs and even street refuse. Trash Mirror No. 3 (2011) uses motors and software designed by the artist that manipulate ‘pixels’ constructed out of flattened, reflective pieces of garbage, which shift to render the silhouette of whomever approaches it.

Vincent Leroy

Vincent Leroy, french artist, present in the international contemporary art world, creates sculptures and installations in movement mixing poetry and technology.

https://vimeo.com/vincentleroy

https://www.vincentleroy.com/

Slow Lens

Floating Particle

Slow Drop

Olafur Eliasson: Take your time

An exhibition that is about the artist’s process and is at once a scholarly retrospective, an experimental site and a laboratory.

A attempt to create an all-inclusive, top, comprehensive, first, grand, laboratory, experimental, superlative, everything type of exhibition, showing a major artwork next to a loose sketch or draft for other pieces, in retrospect, eclipses the simple, captivating beauty and impact of Eliasson’s installations.

A giant, circular-shaped mirror, 40 feet in diameter and weighing 600 pounds, is mounted to the ceiling at an angle, rotating at one revolution per minute. The installation destabilizes viewers’ perception of space as they pass beneath it. Through the reflection of the gallery in the mirror, the piece actually adds light and space to the whole exhibition. Inevitably, partially also due to the weird and unpredictable layout of the rest of the exhibition, this room becomes the centre of Take Your Time. The slow motion of the ceiling piece, as well as its awkward angle that evokes the illusion that the walls bend, turn the gallery in a fascinating surreal-meditative space. Spontaneously, visitors lie down on the vast, hardwood floor and stare into the bright reflective surface of the mirror, observing how the environment distorts glacially. 

Mirror foil, aluminum, steel, motor, and control unit.

Olafur Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson is a Danish-Icelandic artist known for sculptures and large-scale installation art employing elemental materials such as light, water, and air temperature to enhance the viewer’s experience. 

https://www.olafureliasson.net/

Olafur Eliasson developed the visual concept for the contemporary ballet Tree of Codes, choreographed by Wayne McGregor and with music composed by Jamie xx.

2015

The stage design uses intricate sets of reflective, transparent, and refractive surfaces and coloured light to create a dynamic, ever-evolving, and complexly layered space in which the dancers are multiplied and overlap.

Lights panning over the audience cause its spectral image to appear on the stage’s reflective, coloured scrims, integrating the viewers with the activity on the stage.

Triggered by Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes (an artwork in the form of a book, which was in turn inspired by Street of Crocodiles, by Bruno Schulz), this new, evening-length work features a company of soloists from the Paris Opera Ballet and dancers from Wayne McGregor Random Dance.

2007

The opera Phaedra by German composer Hans Werner Henze was commissioned by the Staatsoper in Berlin and premiered in September 2007.

Eliasson created the spatial concept.

The focus of the individual scenes alternated between the music and the visual elements. These comprised monofrequency lights; a kaleidoscope; the works Your space embracer 2004 and Square sphere 2007; and a vertical mirror that spanned the entire stage and reflected the audience as well as the orchestra, which had been moved to the back of the auditorium.